Julie Machin

AMATEUR MAG # 5 /// AS FAR AS I CAN REMEMBER I ALWAYS WANTED TO BE A WIGGER

par Julie Machin


Cover by Shera

Yeah! Le 5éme numéro du mag street&arty, suisse&cool AMATEUR vient de sortir, et comme c'est les copains, ben dans chaque issue, j'ai droit à une double page pour écrire sur ce que je veux (et ça Maurice, ça n'a pas de prix)... Alors voilà un truc pour tous les haterz, qui pourront se réjouir de commenter de leurs plus belles insultes! (ouais je vous vois venir!) <3




Artwork by M•P•Y

WHO DOESN’T WANT TO BE AS COOL AS A NIGGER IS?



I was about to write on all those fake peeps we mostly see at night, at parties, bringing the cool out their home. But, it would have been pretentious, wouldn’t it? Why should we be pissed about wannabes, about posers or about wiggers?
They are just people who would have loved to be born and raised into a culture they admire.
And we can’t accuse them or at least we shouldn’t…



If we go back to the 20s, the born of glorious Afro American music like jazz and their subculture they hardly settled down to get ahead segregation, saw the raise of the White Negro movement. White peeps acting black, living black, talking jive, wearing zoot, calling themselves ‘voluntary black’ - Mezz Mezzrow, a jazz musician, was a big figure in this movement, even asking to get in the black block in jail, when he got caught for drug dealin’.

But please understand, the whiteys didn’t have anything to claim, to fight for, they were living in a boring culture upon their white, well settled-littleass. They needed some thrills, facing black music club prohibition, and acting against the well established sermon: black peeps don’t have the knowledge, black peeps can’t rule.
They didn’t steal their style, their culture; they just took part of it and helped to bring the black culture to a hyper step. And finally, black culture from jazz scene to hip-hop, has always remained the coolest thing ever.

Does anyone agree with me that Afro-American culture was maybe the best to happen to the US and helped building what we love the US for? For sure this first craze helped to bring Afro-Americans to another level of American society, even if it took too many fuckin’ years for those brainlesses to understand and accept.

In the 40s, Hipsters were already there. ‘Hipster’ is not a brand new term so; but today, it’s weird in a kind of way. Don’t you think, these days, it’s pejorative?
I mean, if you are defined as a hipster, for me it means what you do is too hype for yall! What the fuck again? Why do we need to define ourselves over others? We just need to live our dreams, to do what is helping us to get our ass out of bed every morning. And for the sake of the cool, please, we need to have fun without compromising the state of people surrounding us.

Back in the days, the hipsters were not from the high class, not at all, it was about the middle class hanging out of the track, into the jazz scene, into subcultures, havin sex by 3, by 4, by 10 maybe, everywhere they could, doin’ drugs, havin’ fuckin’ fun!

Finally, people enjoying what they love, are cool by nature.

So why do a bunch of peeps need to act strongly in a way they are not??? And why couldn’t a whitey from high-class suburbs be in love with hiphop culture, get at least a tenth of Young Weezy’s tattoos and speak the ghetto slang?

I think, unconsciously we all need to fight for something, or to remain to a culture, to a way of life. This is what builds our personality and makes us what we are. What happened to Afro-American culture - from segregation to the burning Bronx - brought strong states to their speeches, strong values to fight for and strong words to their lyrics.
Any pre-pubescent teen can easily fall into the ‘I have something to claim’ way, just cause he is fascinated. So we can excuse his stupid inner personality search.

But then, look at them, what the damn they try to do?

If we love hip-hop, if we love tattoos, if we love the slang, if we love black ass, we need to get the knowledge of all of that. We are passionate by those cultures, fascinated by gangsters; we need to get to know what it is really about.

At the time we’ll know all of that, we’ll share those values, we’ll be able to really act the right wigger way, respecting what the nigger way really reminds to!

If you ever told yourself once : ‘I’m pretty fly - for a white guy’, then think about those past words and don’t forget that it is not about a skin tone.

You don’t need to act cool. Just be yourself and have fun, then you’ll be the coolest person ever!



Some interesting reads :

‚The Power of the Zoot ‚Youth Culture and Resistance during World War II‘‚ by Luis Alvarez

‚The White Negro: Superficial Reflections on the Hipster‘, an essay by Norman Mailer

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